U.S.: Death Rates for Three Most Common Cancers Among Youth, by cancer type
Cancer type2001,
per 100,000
2011,
per 100,000
2021,
per 100,000
Bone and articular cartilage0.230.210.25
Brain0.620.650.59
Leukemia0.900.630.48
  • Region: United States
  • Time period: 2001, 2011, and 2021
  • Published: Nov 2023

Data Analysis and Insights

Updated: Mar 28, 2024 | Published by: Statistico

Decline in Leukemia death rates

Leukemia death rates among U.S. youth saw a significant decline over two decades, decreasing from 0.90 per 100,000 in 2001 to 0.48 per 100,000 in 2021. This represents a drop of nearly 47%, indicating a substantial improvement in leukemia outcomes or treatments during this period.

Brain cancer mortality rates decreased

Brain cancer, one of the most common cancers among U.S. youth, experienced a decrease in mortality rates from 0.62 per 100,000 in 2001 to 0.59 per 100,000 in 2021. Although a modest reduction, this change suggests progress in either brain cancer treatments or diagnosis over the last 20 years.

Increase in bone and articular cartilage cancer death rates

In contrast to leukemia and brain cancer, death rates for bone and articular cartilage cancer among U.S. youth increased from 0.23 per 100,000 in 2001 to 0.25 per 100,000 in 2021. This rise, although slight, highlights a need for enhanced focus on treatment or prevention strategies for this cancer type.

Comparative analysis of cancer death rates in 2011

By 2011, leukemia death rates had notably reduced to 0.63 per 100,000, positioning it as the cancer type with the highest improvement in survival rates among the three most common cancers in U.S. youth. Meanwhile, brain cancer death rates slightly increased to 0.65 per 100,000, and bone and articular cartilage cancer death rates also saw a minor decrease to 0.21 per 100,000.

Overall trend of cancer death rates from 2001 to 2021

Over a span of two decades, the overall trend shows a decline in cancer death rates among the three most common cancers in U.S. youth. Leukemia and brain cancer saw reductions in mortality rates, while bone and articular cartilage cancer experienced a marginal increase. This pattern underscores the advancements in medical research and healthcare strategies targeting these cancers.

Frequently Asked Questions

How did leukemia death rates among U.S. youth change from 2001 to 2021?

Leukemia death rates among U.S. youth decreased by nearly 47%, from 0.90 per 100,000 in 2001 to 0.48 per 100,000 in 2021.

What changes occurred in brain cancer mortality rates from 2001 to 2021?

Brain cancer mortality rates in U.S. youth slightly decreased from 0.62 per 100,000 in 2001 to 0.59 per 100,000 in 2021.

Terms and Definitions

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. There are over 100 types of cancer, including breast cancer, skin cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, and lymphoma.

A death rate is a measure of the number of deaths in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. It is often expressed as deaths per 1,000 or 100,000 individuals per year.

Incidence rate, in epidemiology, is the measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period. It is usually calculated as the number of new cases during a period divided by the amount of time at risk.

Mortality rate, also known as death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 or 100,000 individuals per year.

Prevalence, in epidemiology, refers to the proportion of a population who have a specific characteristic in a given time period. In relation to a disease, prevalence would refer to the proportion of a population who have (or had) the disease at a point in time.

In cancer statistics, survival rate is a measure of the number of people who remain alive for a certain period of time after being diagnosed with cancer. This is usually defined as the percentage of patients alive at some point subsequent to the diagnosis of their cancer.

Cancer screening refers to the use of various tests and procedures to detect cancer in individuals who do not have any signs or symptoms of the disease. The goal is to find and diagnose cancer early, during its most treatable stages.

A risk factor is any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases their likelihood of developing a disease or injury. In cancer, risk factors can be genetic, environmental, or lifestyle-related. Examples include smoking, radiation exposure, certain chemicals and other substances, certain behaviors, and family history of cancer.
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