U.S.: Breast Cancer Incidence Rate, by year
YearIncidence rate,
per 100,000 population
2020124.7
2019137.4
2018134.2
2017133.0
2016131.8
2015132.2
2014132.0
2013130.8
2012129.8
2011130.9
2010127.7
2009130.6
2008129.5
2007128.8
2006126.3
2005126.9
2004128.1
2003126.7
2002136.6
2001139.4
2000136.6
1999142.3
1998141.6
1997137.9
1996134.5
1995132.0
1994131.3
1993128.8
1992131.3
1991132.1
1990131.0
1989127.2
1988131.1
1987134.0
1986126.9
1985123.8
1984115.8
1983110.0
1982105.3
1981105.1
1980103.2
1979102.6
1978102.0
1977101.6
1976102.1
1975106.0
  • Region: United States
  • Time period: 1975 to 2020
  • Published: Nov 2022

Data Analysis and Insights

Updated: Mar 28, 2024 | Published by: Statistico

Peak Incidence Rate in 1999

The peak incidence rate of breast cancer among U.S. women occurred in 1999, with a rate of 142.3 per 100,000 population. This year stands out as the highest recorded rate over the provided timeframe, emphasizing a significant health concern during that period.

Overall Trend from 1975 to 2020

Analyzing the trend from 1975 to 2020, the data reveals a general increase in breast cancer incidence rates, starting from 106.0 per 100,000 population in 1975 to reaching 124.7 per 100,000 population in 2020. This upward trend underscores the growing prevalence of breast cancer among U.S. women over the years.

Decrease in Incidence Rate from 2019 to 2020

A noteworthy decrease in the incidence rate was observed between 2019 and 2020, from 137.4 to 124.7 per 100,000 population. This represents a significant year-over-year reduction, marking a positive shift in the fight against breast cancer.

Stability in Incidence Rates in the Early 2010s

Between 2010 and 2015, breast cancer incidence rates showed remarkable stability, fluctuating slightly around the 130 per 100,000 population mark. This period of relative stability suggests a plateau in the incidence rate trend during these years.

Lowest Incidence Rate in 1980

The lowest incidence rate in the dataset was recorded in 1980, with 103.2 per 100,000 population. This year marks the minimum incidence rate, providing a baseline for evaluating increases in subsequent years.

Incidence Rate Rebounds in the Late 1980s

After reaching its lowest point in 1980, the incidence rate rebounded in the late 1980s, with 1987 marking a significant increase to 134.0 per 100,000 population. This rebound illustrates the variability in breast cancer incidence rates over time.

Frequently Asked Questions

When was the peak incidence rate of breast cancer among U.S. women recorded?

The peak incidence rate of breast cancer among U.S. women was recorded in 1999.

What has been the overall trend in breast cancer incidence rates from 1975 to 2020?

The overall trend from 1975 to 2020 has shown a general increase in breast cancer incidence rates.

When was the lowest incidence rate of breast cancer recorded?

The lowest incidence rate was recorded in 1980.

Terms and Definitions

Breast cancer is a type of cancer that forms in the cells of the breasts. This can occur in both men and women, but it is significantly more common in women. Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast begin to grow out of control, forming a tumor, which can often be seen on an X-ray or felt as a lump.

Incidence rate refers to the number of new cases of a particular condition or disease in a population over a specific period, frequently per year. It represents the probability or risk of an individual in a population developing the disease within a defined timeframe.

Cancer incidence refers to the occurrence of new cases of cancer in a population over a specific period. This is usually expressed as a rate (i.e. number of new cases per a specific number of people, often per 100,000 individuals) and can provide valuable information about the prevalence and risk of cancer in a certain population or demographic.

The cancer mortality rate is the number of deaths, in a population, that occur due to cancer over a specific period. This helps to understand the severity and impact of the disease on a population.

Geographic variation in cancer incidence refers to the differences in cancer rates that are observed between different geographic regions. These variations can be due to a variety of factors including environmental exposure, genetics, lifestyle, dietary habits, and access to healthcare services.

Early detection in the context of cancer means diagnosing the disease in its initial stages, before it has spread. This is crucial because the chances of effectively treating cancer generally increase when the disease is detected and treated early.

A risk factor refers to any attribute, characteristic or exposure that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. In the context of cancer, risk factors can be many and varied, ranging from lifestyle choices like tobacco usage and alcohol consumption, to uncontrollable conditions such as age, gender, and genetic predisposition.

Cancer preventive screening involves the use of medical tests to detect cancer in people who have no symptoms of the disease. The goal is to identify cancer early, when treatment is more likely to be successful. For breast cancer, mammograms are the most common screening test.

A mammogram is a type of X-ray specifically designed to examine breast tissue. They are used as a diagnostic tool to detect early signs of breast cancer, often before any symptoms are present. Regular mammograms are recommended as part of preventive healthcare for women of certain ages or with specific risk factors.
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