Spain: Infant Mortality Rate, by year
YearDeaths per 1000 live births
20212.6
20202.6
20192.7
20182.7
20172.7
20162.7
20152.8
20142.8
20132.9
20122.9
20113.0
  • Region: Spain
  • Time period: 2011 to 2021
  • Published: Feb 2024

Data Analysis and Insights

Updated: Apr 13, 2024 | Published by: Statistico

Decline in Infant Mortality Rate Over a Decade

The infant mortality rate in Spain has experienced a gradual decline over the last decade, decreasing from 3.0 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011 to 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2021. This reduction highlights significant improvements in healthcare or social conditions affecting infant health.

Stability in Recent Years

In the most recent years, specifically from 2020 to 2021, the infant mortality rate in Spain has remained stable at 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births. This stability indicates a plateau in the improvements or consistent conditions affecting infant mortality.

Consistent Yearly Decreases

Between 2011 and 2015, there was a consistent yearly decrease in the infant mortality rate, demonstrating a period of continuous improvement in factors influencing infant health in Spain. Each year within this timeframe saw a reduction or maintenance in mortality rates, underscoring effective health interventions or policies.

Minimal Fluctuations in Mortality Rate

The data shows minimal fluctuations in the infant mortality rate throughout the decade, with the largest year-to-year change being a decrease of 0.1 deaths per 1,000 live births. These minor variations reflect a relatively stable healthcare environment for infants in Spain.

Overall Reduction Over the Decade

From 2011 to 2021, Spain achieved an overall reduction in the infant mortality rate of 0.4 deaths per 1,000 live births. This decrease, although gradual, indicates progress in the healthcare system's ability to prevent infant deaths and improve maternal and child health services.

Frequently Asked Questions

How has the infant mortality rate in Spain changed over the last decade?

The infant mortality rate in Spain has decreased from 3.0 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011 to 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2021.

Has there been any change in Spain's infant mortality rate in recent years?

No, the infant mortality rate in Spain has remained steady at 2.6 deaths per 1,000 live births from 2020 to 2021.

Terms and Definitions

Infant Mortality Rate, or IMR, is a statistical measure and critical indicator of public health in a specific region or country. It signifies the number of deaths of infants (those under one year of age) per 1000 live births in a given year.

Neonatal Mortality Rate is a subset of the Infant Mortality Rate that specifically refers to the number of deaths of newborns (less than 28 days old) per 1000 live births in a given year.

Post-Neonatal Mortality Rate is another aspect of the Infant Mortality Rate representing the deaths of infants aged 28 days to 11 months per 1000 live births in a given year.

Perinatal Mortality Rate is a measure that includes both neonatal deaths (within the first 28 days) and fetal deaths (stillbirths after 24 weeks of gestation) per 1000 total births.

Late fetal death denotes the death of a fetus at 22 weeks of gestation or later or with a body mass of at least 500g. This term is important as it is connected with perinatal mortality and stillbirth rates.

The Under-5 Mortality Rate represents the probability of a child dying before reaching the age of five, measured per 1000 live births. It is a critical indicator of child health and overall development in countries.
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