Switzerland: Infant Mortality Rate, by year
YearDeaths per 1000 live births
20213.4
20203.4
20193.5
20183.6
20173.6
20163.7
20153.7
20143.8
20133.8
20123.8
20113.9
  • Region: Switzerland
  • Time period: 2011 to 2021
  • Published: Feb 2024

Data Analysis and Insights

Updated: Apr 13, 2024 | Published by: Statistico

Decline in Infant Mortality Rate

The infant mortality rate in Switzerland has shown a consistent decrease over the past decade, from 3.9 deaths per 1000 live births in 2011 to 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births in 2021. This gradual decline highlights improvements in healthcare quality, access, and possibly broader socio-economic factors contributing to the well-being of infants.

Stability in Recent Years

In more recent years, the rate has stabilized, with the figure remaining constant at 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births for both 2020 and 2021. This stability indicates a plateau in the impact of interventions or the reaching of a threshold in healthcare advancements impacting infant mortality.

Incremental Improvement

The data reveals an incremental improvement in infant mortality rates, with a slow but steady reduction annually. Notably, there is a 0.1 death decrease almost every year, exemplifying a gradual approach towards minimizing infant deaths.

No Significant Yearly Changes

Despite the overall declining trend, there are no instances of significant yearly changes in the infant mortality rate. The largest year-to-year change observed is only 0.1 death per 1000 live births, suggesting that dramatic improvements or deteriorations within a single year are uncommon.

Lowest Recorded Rate

The years 2020 and 2021 mark the lowest recorded infant mortality rates in the dataset, with both years registering 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births. This achievement underscores the effectiveness of ongoing healthcare strategies and the importance of sustained efforts in this area.

Consistency Over the Last Decade

Throughout the last decade, the downward trend in infant mortality rates has been consistent, with a gradual decrease each year. This consistency underscores the continuous efforts and improvements in healthcare services and practices in Switzerland aimed at safeguarding the health of newborns.

Frequently Asked Questions

What has been the trend in the infant mortality rate in Switzerland over the past decade?

The infant mortality rate in Switzerland has steadily decreased from 3.9 deaths per 1000 live births in 2011 to 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births in 2021.

Has the infant mortality rate in Switzerland changed significantly in recent years?

The infant mortality rate has remained stable at 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births in both 2020 and 2021.

What is the lowest recorded infant mortality rate in Switzerland?

The lowest recorded infant mortality rate in the dataset is 3.4 deaths per 1000 live births, achieved in both 2020 and 2021.

Terms and Definitions

This rate refers to the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.

This is the total number of death per year divided by the mid-year population, often expressed per 1,000 individuals. This rate includes deaths of all age groups and, therefore, doesn't provide specific information on child mortality.

This is the number of deaths of infants aged less than 28 days per 1,000 live births in a given year. It is further divided into early neonatal mortality (0-6 days) and late neonatal mortality (7-27 days).

This refers to the deaths of infants aged 28 days to 11 months. It is usually measured per 1,000 survivors to 28 days of life in a specific year.

This rate refers to the number of deaths in children under five years old per 1,000 live births. It provides a broader picture of child mortality as it encompasses neonatal, infant, and toddler's death.

This rate measures the number of women who die from pregnancy-related causes while pregnant or within 42 days of pregnancy termination per 100,000 live births. It is a critical statistic in assessing the quality of healthcare for pregnant women.

The complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of human conception, irrespective of the duration of the pregnancy, which, after such separation, breathes or shows any other evidence of life such as the beating of the heart.

This is the number of deaths of babies stillborn (after 28 weeks of pregnancy) and in the first week of life per 1,000 total births (stillbirths and live births).
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