Sweden: Fertility Rate, by year
YearNumber of born children per woman
20231.50
20221.52
20211.67
20201.66
20191.70
20181.75
20171.78
20161.85
20151.85
20141.88
20131.89
20121.91
20111.90
20101.98
  • Region: Sweden
  • Time period: 2010 to 2023
  • Published: Feb 2024

Data Analysis and Insights

Updated: Apr 11, 2024 | Published by: Statistico | About Us / Data / Analysis

Decline in Fertility Rate Over a Decade

The fertility rate in Sweden has seen a consistent decline from 1.98 children per woman in 2010 to 1.50 children per woman in 2023, marking a significant decrease over a span of 13 years. This trend highlights a reduction of 0.48 children per woman, indicating changing demographic patterns and possibly shifting societal norms or economic factors affecting family planning decisions.

Slight Fluctuations Observed Yearly

Despite the overall downward trend, yearly fluctuations in the fertility rate were noted, with minor increases observed in certain years. For example, there was an increase from 1.89 children per woman in 2013 to 1.91 in 2012, and again a slight rise from 1.66 in 2020 to 1.67 in 2021. These minor variations reflect short-term changes that could be influenced by a variety of factors, including economic conditions, policy changes, or societal trends.

Significant Drop Post-2016

A notable decline in the fertility rate was observed after 2016, where the rate dropped from 1.85 children per woman to 1.50 children per woman in 2023. The period from 2016 to 2023 marks a significant shift with a reduction of 0.35 children per woman, suggesting a possible acceleration in the trend of declining fertility rates during these years.

Comparatively High Rates in Early 2010s

The early 2010s witnessed comparatively higher fertility rates, with the peak observed in 2010 at 1.98 children per woman. The period from 2010 to 2014 maintained a rate above 1.85 children per woman, indicating a more favorable demographic trend for population growth during these years, possibly supported by different socio-economic conditions or family policies in place at that time.

Lowest Rate Recorded in Recent Year

The lowest fertility rate recorded in the provided data is 1.50 children per woman in 2023. This represents the most significant decline to date and could have implications for population demographics, aging, and workforce sustainability in Sweden, indicating urgent need for policy review and potential intervention to address the falling fertility trend.

Comparison with Historical Peak

When comparing the historical peak in 2010 of 1.98 children per woman with the lowest rate in 2023, a stark contrast is evident. This comparison underscores the changing dynamics within the Swedish society over the years, potentially reflecting alterations in personal choices, economic stability, access to education, and healthcare advancements that influence family planning decisions.

Frequently Asked Questions

How has the fertility rate in Sweden changed over the past decade?

The fertility rate in Sweden has consistently declined from 1.98 children per woman in 2010 to 1.50 children per woman in 2023, marking a significant decrease.

Were there any slight increases in the fertility rate during this period?

Yes, minor increases were noted in certain years, for example, it rose from 1.89 children per woman in 2013 to 1.91 in 2014, and from 1.66 in 2020 to 1.67 in 2021.

When was a significant drop in the fertility rate observed?

A notable decline in the fertility rate was observed after 2016, dropping from 1.85 children per woman to 1.50 children per woman in 2023.

What is the lowest recorded fertility rate according to the provided data?

The lowest recorded fertility rate in the provided data is 1.50 children per woman in 2023.

Terms and Definitions

Fertility rate refers to the number of live births per 1000 women of reproductive age (usually measured between the ages of 15-49 years) in a population in a given year. It's a crucial demographic indicator that helps gauge the level at which a population is replacing itself and can influence a country's socioeconomic dynamics.

Total fertility rate, often referred to as TFR, is an average number of children that would be born to a woman over her lifetime, if she were to experience the exact current age-specific fertility rates. It serves as an indicator of the potential population growth of a country.

Gross reproduction rate or GRR refers to the average number of daughters a woman would have during her lifetime, assuming she experiences current age-specific fertility rates. It is often used in population projections.

Replacement-level fertility is the total fertility rate—the average number of children born per woman—at which a population exactly replaces itself from one generation to the next, without migration. It is roughly 2.1 children per woman for most industrialized countries.

Crude Birth Rate or CBR, is the number of live births per 1,000 people per year. It is used as an indicator of the natural increase in a population.

Age-specific fertility rate (ASFR) is a more specific measure of fertility which calculates the number of births in a year to women in particular age groups, usually in five-year age group.

A population pyramid is a graphical representation that shows the distribution of various age groups in a population. It typically illustrates the number (or percentage) of males and females in each age group, which can indicate the country's fertility rate.
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